Father homeschooling son

Education is an important factor in the lives of many families. It can affect where you choose to live, your financial habits and even how you decide to vote. As time goes on and more educational options are available to families, many households are choosing to homeschool.

According to the U.S. Department of Education, 1.8 million students were homeschooled in the U.S. in 2012.  Parents gave many reasons for making the choice to homeschool, the most notable being a concern about the environment in other schools and a dissatisfaction with the instruction.

Once a family has decided to homeschool, though, how they set up a learning environment is completely up to them.

How do you decide what your at-home classroom should look like? How do you furnish it? What makes it conducive to learning? This may change as you figure out what works for your family over time, but here’s a good place to start.

Lower Elementary

One of the keys to mastering homeschooling is staying organized. A great way to stay organized and help your lower elementary students learn their colors is with color-coded organization. Each subject gets its own color. You can buy colored bins to store each subject’s supplies in and use the same color notebooks and paper organizers.

For days when the students are having a hard time focusing or if you need them to stay seated while reading or teaching a new skill, area rugs can work great. Get each student you’re homeschooling a small round rug. It can be their favorite color or maybe have their favorite character on it. This will be a place they want to sit and get excited about – most days.

Room Supplies

  • Bulletin board
  • Standard desk
  • Chairs
  • Bookcase (with age-appropriate books)
  • Storage containers
  • Comfy seating
  • Play area rug
  • Learning games
  • Activity space (for crafting and working on hands-on projects)

Upper Elementary

A plethora of books is great for students in any grade but especially for students in upper elementary who are really honing in on their reading and comprehension and continuing to develop that love for reading.

“I think it’s important to have a variety of books available to the student,” says Camille Di Maio, a writer and homeschooler of four children. “I love utilizing the library, but having books on hand of all subjects helps the student explore their interests in their free time.”

If you’re not sure where to find a variety of books on a budget, Di Maio suggests checking thrift stores and sales at bookstores. She also mentions that older homeschooling families are often eager to give their old books to younger families.

Room Supplies

  • Bulletin board
  • White board
  • Standard desk
  • Chairs
  • Bookcase (with age-appropriate books)
  • Storage containers
  • Comfy seating
  • Tablets
  • Activity space (for crafting and working on hands-on projects)

Middle School

Now that your student is in middle school, you may want to introduce things that children in traditional schools experience, like lockers. It helps them mark this next step in their education. And who didn’t love the feeling of finally having your own locker you could decorate and make your own?

Computers have become a daily part of our lives, and it’s reflected in school curriculums. Middle school might be a good time to give your student their own laptop to do work, research and tests related to their curriculum. Becoming proficient in various computer programs will set your student on a great path, even post-homeschooling.

Room Supplies

  • Bulletin board
  • White board
  • Office desk
  • Office chair
  • Bookcase (with age-appropriate books)
  • Organizational furniture
  • Break area
  • Lockers
  • Laptops
  • Activity space (for crafting and working on hands-on projects)

High School

Once high school starts, let your homeschooler help design their space. Make it more personal to them. Creating a space they love will give them more personal interest in their studies. Consider things like artwork and more “grown-up” seating like a sofa or plush seating of some kind. If you have more than one high school student, keep the space neutral, but let them personalize their area in it.

Room Supplies

  • Bulletin board
  • White board
  • Office desk
  • Office chair
  • Bookcase (with age-appropriate books)
  • Organizational furniture
  • Break area
  • Lockers
  • Laptops
  • Activity space (for crafting and working on hands-on projects)

Lesson Plans

Technology has given the ultimate assist to parents seeking to plan a comprehensive curriculum for their children. By using the internet, parents can access curriculum guides and lesson planners.

While it’s best to find a local homeschooling support group in your area to assist you with questions and issues that arise, many questions can be answered by online forums such as Homeschools.com.

If you’re up for the commitment and want to build a stronger bond with your child, you may want to consider homeschooling as an educational option. With the right tools, setting and supplies, it’s possible to make your home a great environment for learning.

Do you have any tips for parents starting to homeschool their children? Share them in the comment section!

Related Posts

This Post Has 4 Comments

  1. We began joining a homeschool group and enrolling in a satellite school that helped us stay on course. Eventually we joined a different group to whom we were accountable. I recommend every home school family start that way.

  2. Thank you so much, this is great! Thorough yet simplified and easy to read. Makes it all seem very approachable to homeschooling beginners. I will share this link with my friends.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *