Side hustles are a powerful way to increase your monthly income and meet financial goals. And, they are becoming so popular that a recent Harvard Business Review article asked the compelling question: “Will the Gig Economy Make the Office Obsolete?”

The article argued that those who work remotely are “more productive, satisfied, and engaged than their office-bound colleagues.” So, it’s no wonder than many people find joy spending time working independently on their side hustles.

Busy women who start side hustles might enjoy it so much that they turn it into a real business someday! (This is what happened to me a few years back.)

However, even if you don’t want to quit your day job, a side hustle is a great way to make extra income, learn new skills and meet financial goals.

Of course, many women want to start a side hustle, but the complexities of managing an already hectic schedule with a side hustle seems problematic to many. However, there are numerous side hustles that busy women can start, even if they only have a little bit of time.

List Your Home on Airbnb

If you live in a desirable area, you could make several hundred dollars a month by renting out your space on Airbnb. You can rent out your basement, your spare room or your entire house (if you have someplace else to stay).

If you’re going to do this, keep in mind that there are some risks and regulations you need to know ahead of time.

If, after reading all the pros and cons, you decide you want to list your place on Airbnb, it requires relatively little time to start.

Do Some Freelance Writing

If you enjoy writing, you should give freelance writing a try. Many people feel like they need their own website or portfolio to start, but that can come later. After all, everyone has to have their first writing job at some point, right?

If you have your own blog or regularly write on a site like Medium, you can use links to those articles to show potential employers your writing abilities. However, you can always create a writing sample to show someone when applying for a job.

Don’t be afraid to write for free at first, as long as you don’t make it a habit as your writing career takes off. Although it could take some time for you to get higher paying jobs, freelance writing is something you can do at night or during your lunch hour while everyone else at your job goes out to eat. This makes it the perfect side hustle for busy women starting out.

Flip Thrift Store Items

All of us have to shop at some point. If you enjoy browsing thrift stores, you might be able to use that time more wisely by finding items to thrift and re-sell.

In fact, Business Insider recently profiled a woman who makes $5,000 a month selling clothes and accessories on the popular app Poshmark. Although it takes time to reach that level of income from flipping thrift store items, you can still make a few hundred dollars a month by buying well-known, name-brand clothes at thrift stores and selling them for a profit.

Start a Home Organizing Business

If you love a label maker almost as much as you love your first child, starting a home organizing business could be right for you.

Again, because you are already busy, don’t feel like you have to put a ton of time and money into creating the perfect website or developing a marketing plan at first. Start small by offering to organize the homes of your friends and family. Then, once you get some good before-and-after pictures, advertise your services on Facebook Marketplace. You can charge an hourly rate for this and do it on the evenings and weekends or whenever you have downtime.

There are, of course, hundreds of side hustles you can do, from driving with Uber to starting a blog to learning how to code. However, the examples above are four side hustles you can start without a significant time or monetary investment. That’s why they’re perfect for busy women who need to make extra money but don’t necessarily have a lot of time to do so.

Do you have a side hustle? If so, how did you start and why did you pick it?

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This Post Has 7 Comments

  1. I work in corporate america… (high end automotive industry) When you are speaking to someone or about someone and say he or she hustles for the money etc, I always thought that was a compliment like they work hard for the money.
    For example someone who has a full time job and has a part time job also or a couple of side gigs you might say they are hustling.
    Most words have duel meanings, but even on the street when someone is hustling they are usually working hard to get what they need or want.

  2. Side hustle?
    When did corporate America become so autonomous with street language? What’s wrong wide side business?
    The people who read these articles are not stupid and ignorant but want straight words not to be talked down to…..

    1. Hi Larry:

      I respect your opinion, but in this case, I don’t view hustle as a bad thing. Hustling connotes hard work and tons of effort. That was the tone the headline was meant to convey. Hard work, hustle, sweat equity, whatever you call it, our readers are putting it in every day.

      Thanks,
      Kevin Graham

    2. Wow, Larry. Maybe some of us want to separate ourselves a bit from “corporate America”. Side “hustle” sounds a lot more fun than side “business”. Don’t take yourself so seriously and you might have some fun, too. I “hustle” every day so some of that hustling might as well be to make some extra “serious” income! Relax a little.

    3. I’m trying to figure out when actual words became “street language.” Street language usually uses standard words and turns it into some other vernacular or fun colloquialism. From what I can gather, the word “hustle” doesn’t totally fit that use. It does seem to fit the description in this article though. Lighten up pal!

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